Author: Gayan

An RHCE, 'Linux' user with 14+ years of experience. Extreme lover of Linux and FOSS. He is passionate to test every Linux distribution & compare with the previous release to write in-depth articles to help the FOSS community.

As promised in my earlier Ubuntu 16.10 review, I have come up with an Ubuntu 16.10 flavors comparison as well, although, I was planning on coming up with this comparison much sooner (but hey, it’s here!) Unlike in my Ubuntu 16.04 LTS flavors comparison which only included two main Ubuntu flavors (Ubuntu GNOME & Kubuntu), this time, I’ve also added Xubuntu 16.10 to the comparison because it was requested by a couple of my readers. The ISO disc image sizes are as follows: Ubuntu 16.10 (1.6 GB), Ubuntu GNOME 16.10 (1.5 GB), Kubuntu 16.10 (1.6 GB) & Xubuntu 16.10 (1.3 GB). And also,…

Read More

After the previous 16.04 Long Term Release, Ubuntu has rolled out its latest ‘short term’ (my own naming convention for the non-LTS releases) version 16.10. Mainly, the ‘short term’ releases are only supported for 9 months and usually include software applications with their recent updates. When you release a new version of your operating system within every 6 months, usually there isn’t a lot of room for adding major changes. And that is the case with many GNU/Linux distributions these days, and Ubuntu 16.10 release is no exception. Since Unity is based on the user application set provided by GNOME desktop environment, according…

Read More

Linux Mint is one of the most popular (GNU/Linux) operating systems around, and according to Distrowatch.com’s popularity ranking factor, for many years now Linux Mint has been on the top 3 most popular distributions (now it’s actually the number one!, surpassing Debian and Ubuntu. By the way, Fedora’s ranking is sinking fast, no surprise there though. Fedora is just a distribution for the coding elite of the GNU/Linux world and not for the average user, there I said it!). And there’s a good and a sensible reason for it (in my opinion anyway). The reason is, with Linux Mint there is a sense…

Read More

Motion interpolation is a technique that can be used to increase the frame-rate (up to 60 frames per second, which roughly equals doubled frame rate for most video files) of a video file. Now what’s in it for the end-user? Simple, without having to re-encode, edit or make any changes to the video file, the end-user will see a much more fluid & smooth video playback, and fluid in the sense that the motions in the video file are being more closer to what we see in the world everyday through our eyes. It’s quite impressive actually! The best way to…

Read More

After reviewing Ubuntu 15.10 a few months ago, I came up with an Ubuntu (15.10) flavor comparison as well. So after reviewing Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, and especially since this is a LTS (Long Term Support) release, I decided to come up with yet another Ubuntu 16.04 LTS flavors comparison that involves Ubuntu, Kubuntu and Ubuntu GNOME because they come with the 3 main desktop environments of GNU/Linux: Unity, KDE Plasma and GNOME. But just like the previous one of its kind, this too will be based on the performance aspect and the stability of the each operating system, and I won’t talk about…

Read More

Ubuntu 16.04 is the 6th Long Term Support (LTS) release of Ubuntu. In a certain sense, the LTS release is the flagship version of Ubuntu that sees a new release in every 2 years, and each release is backed by 5 years of support, opposed to the 9 month support of the normal Ubuntu release that sees a new face in every 6 months. In simple terms, the LTS pledges more stability at the cost of not having the most up-to-date versions of the software packages it comes with. When Ubuntu 16.04 LTS was first released, I immediately downloaded it and installed it on the partition…

Read More

Solus is a GNU/Linux distribution that was first called SolusOS which first appeared in 2012. Back then it was based on the Debian core, and the desktop environment was GNOME2. But due to lack of manpower, the developers abandoned it in October, 2013. Then in early 2015 it reappeared, calling itself EvolveOS and this time it wasn’t based on any distribution. It also featured a desktop shell (a desktop shell is a basic GUI that gives the users with the ability to open & manage applications through a single interface. It’s the most basic form of a desktop environment in the sense that it merely…

Read More

Microsoft Windows XP is an old operating system that has reached the end of its support from Microsoft. But if you’re still required to run it, then the best way to do so is to execute it on a virtual machine. I completely switched to ‘Linux’ about a year ago and personally, and starting very recently, I wanted to run Windows XP because I have to use a couple of applications that’re only designed to run in Windows, and for a couple of months I’ve been using my licensed Windows 8.1 in a virtual machine on Ubuntu 15.10 just for the sake of…

Read More

In GNU/Linux, the free command displays information about the memory usage of the operating system such as the total amount of RAM available to the system, how much of it is free and how much is used by the operating system & user applications etc. There are many other commands in GNU/Linux that can be used to view such information, but the free command gives a clean & a simple overview of the system’s memory that is easy to ‘read’ (well, when you use it properly). In this article, I’ll give you some simple examples of various ways you can use it…

Read More

I have a USB DVD writer (Imation ‘Slimtype’) and the other day I tried to erase a CD-RW that I haven’t really used in a few months using Brasero DiscBurner (in Ubuntu 15.10). It had some data on it and the file manager was able to mount it, but Brasero for some reason failed to even recognize that a CD was present in the DVD burner, let along erasing it. Now I’m sure I could’ve done it by using a different disc burning GUI, but I’m a bit of a lazy bugger 😉 so I tried to erase the CD-RW using the…

Read More

RAM disk is a virtual disk drive that’s mounted in your RAM. And because it’s located in RAM (Random Access Memory), the main benefit is its staggering speed. In situations like video rendering or editing and gaming etc, by having your files put inside a RAM disk can greatly speed things up, provided that you have a large amount of RAM. RAM disks can also be used not only to deliver better performance but to offload (read/write requests) the main storage device, thus prolonging its life as well (specially in a server environment). But for the average computer user having a RAM disk might not make a…

Read More

Fedora 23 arrived a week later than originally planned, just like Fedora 22. While there are couple of Fedora spins, featuring popular desktop environments, for the past couple of days, I’ve been using the main release which is based on GNOME Shell (3.18). It’s true that GNOME 3.18 comes with many subtle refinements and features, but one of these features (a major one unfortunately) looked confusing to me, just like I find it difficult to cope with the default desktop layout of GNOME3, which is why I only use the ‘Classic Desktop Session’ as it resembles the old GNOME2 desktop (well,…

Read More