Author: Gayan

An RHCE, 'Linux' user with 14+ years of experience. Extreme lover of Linux and FOSS. He is passionate to test every Linux distribution & compare with the previous release to write in-depth articles to help the FOSS community.

Ubuntu comes with a couple of different flavors which are largely defined by the desktop environment that’s included in the each flavor, and by the default set of software applications included, to some extent. While there are about nine flavors (official), targeting various kinds of end-users, I thought making a comparison of the three major flavors, specifically concerning their performance (since I’m more of a technically oriented individual, plus you can easily find their various new features on most other websites anyway), namely Ubuntu 15.10 (Unity desktop 7.3.2), Kubuntu 15.10 (KDE Plasma 5.4.0) and Ubuntu Gnome 15.10 (GNOME Shell 3.16) would come in handy for someone who’s…

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Largely unchanged, Ubuntu 15.10 (code named: ‘Willy Werewolf’) is a less exciting release, well, for those that use the desktop version at least. Kernel is updated to version 4.2, X.org to 1.17.2, Compiz 0.9.12.2 and Unity desktop version is still at 7.3.2 (the same version included in Ubuntu 15.04) without any major features as well. The default set of applications are also updated (Firfefox 41.0.2, LibreOffice 5.0.2.2, Ubuntu Software Center 13.10 and most of the other set of applications which are part of the Gnome3 desktop are updated to 3.16.1, except for the file manager where it’s version is 3.14.1 since it’s patched separately by…

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Korora is an old GNU/Linux distribution (originated in 2005) that used to be based on ‘Gentoo’. But in 2007 the development of Korora was abandoned, yet in 2010, it was reborn, but this time it was based on ‘Fedora’, rather than ‘Gentoo’. But to be honest with you, I’ve never had used ‘Korora’ before. Yet, after installing ‘Korora 22’ (based on Fedora 22) and using it for the past three days, it’s goals became pretty clear to me. It is this good looking ‘Fedora remix’ that strives to be the ‘Fedora’ that hosts a mild attitude & a sense of practicality, although good folks at…

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It’s tough, robust, stable, idealistic, and loyal to its principles. This is my conceived idea of the GNU/Linux distribution known as ‘Fedora’. That said, I don’t necessarily admire all of its characteristics, but I deal with Fedora with respect because I have a history with it. Because even though over the years I’ve used other distributions most of the time, I’ve never lost my love for ‘Fedora’, because whenever I use it, I just feel at home, put in my element. It’s quite confusing really 😛 . Anyhow, after being impressed by Fedora 21, for the past six months, it has been my main operating system and…

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Ubuntu 15.04, code named ‘Vivid Vervet’, does not include any significant changes from an end-user’s point of view, although, as far as system administrators & perhaps (low-level) software developers are concerned, a significant change  has taken place because with this release, Ubuntu has switched to the widely accepted (but ironically heavily criticized) ‘systemd’ ‘init’ system from ‘Upstart’ (developed originally by Ubuntu). In the GNU/Linux operating system, ‘init’ is the first process the Kernel (the heart of any operating system because it deals directly with the hardware) executes, and from the boot-up till you shutdown the computer, it controls all the…

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For my operating system reviews, I frequently rely on the ‘dd’ utility in GNU/Linux for creating a bootable USB storage device (pendrive) from an ISO disc image. While using ‘dd’ is easy and convenient, its approach is such that it rearranges the partition layout of the USB storage device thus a formal disk format cannot be used to restore the storage device to its previous state, and until you restore the partition layout to its previous state, it cannot be used as a normal storage media either. Now, I have written a ‘how to’ in the past describing a way in which Microsoft Windows 8/8.1 users…

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‘mpv’ is a powerful multimedia player that is based on MPLayer and mplayer2 projects. It also contains new features of its own (according to the developers) and supports hardware (GPU) based video decoding (through VDPAU, VAAPI and VDA APIs) as well. It comes with a built-in GUI but it is a very simple looking one, and by default it won’t give you access to (useful) features like audio/video sync, volume gain, changing aspect ratio etc. You can however, use the keyboard shortcuts for controlling a number of advanced features, including the ones mentioned above. If you require access to even more advanced options (adding post-processing filters for instance), then you…

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I recently purchased a Western Digital My Passport Ultra (1TB, USB 3.0) external hard disk as I was running out of space to save my files. Although I dual-boot a GNU/Linux distribution (which is the awesome Fedora 21 nowadays) with Windows 8.1, and almost all of my friends rely on the Windows operating system, I took the decision to format it into ‘Ext4’ anyway, despite having the obvious drawback to which I am bound (that would be sharing data of course 🙂 ). To be honest, I never had used a native GNU/Linux file system on a large USB hard disk before, thus, after creating an ‘Ext4’ file system…

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The Fedora community took almost a year for developing and releasing the version 21. Though I am not exactly clear of the exact reasons for this delay, after using the default Gnome 3 spin for a couple of days, I must say ‘the wait’ was worth waiting for, after all, “all good things take time”. However, first it is worth noting that I have an immense respect for the Gnome desktop developers for they have mastered some aspects of the art of simple, intuitive & lightweight software design, though, because they have little regard for what the end-users have to say, in their arrogance, have over…

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‘Linux Lite’ is a GNU/Linux distribution based on the Ubuntu’s Long Term Support releases. It includes the lightweight & fully functional XFCE desktop environment, comes with full support for proprietor multimedia playback & a few applications of its own (software updater, additional app installer, a ‘cleaner’…) that should assist a novice user for easily managing the installed operating system. Like many other, it consists pretty much all the software applications that most users would require to get things done (Office suite, PDF viewer, GIMP editor, VLC, Optical disc burner, Web Browser & an E-mail client, Backup utility etc) but can…

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Ubuntu comes with a disk space usage analyzer (GUI) called ‘Baobab’ (Gnome application). Other than displaying the disk space usage using pretty charts, it also used to include an option that lets you disable low disk space warnings, but there is no such option anymore in the version that is included in Ubuntu 14.10. If you are an Ubuntu 14.10 user however, looking for a way to disable these disk space warning, luckily you can still do it through the ‘gsettings’ command-line utility or using the ‘Dconf-tools’ GUI. If you just want to disable these warning, then it is probably…

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Summary: In terms of performance, Ubuntu 14.10 is slightly degraded (except for the power consumption) compared to 14.04 LTS, but is still a stable release. I firmly believe that it is a fundamental mistake to release a new version of any operating system every six months (there should at least be a 10-12 months time-frame). It is such a short period for making an OS that contains major new features but is also stable. Otherwise, new releases will have a tendency of drifting towards extremes (being buggy, or stable but boring…). The recently released Ubuntu 14.10 is no exception as…

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